Please check the facts

I castigate the staff of Dental Economics for blithely printing Dr. Kevin Toal`s letter in the December 1999 issue without checking the facts. Of course Dr. Toal made it difficult by stating the factoid - a statement appearing as fact which isn`t - "while it is known that the composites are estrogenic ..." without any references for you to check.

Scott R. McAdoo, DDS

Denver, Colo.

I castigate the staff of Dental Economics for blithely printing Dr. Kevin Toal`s letter in the December 1999 issue without checking the facts. Of course Dr. Toal made it difficult by stating the factoid - a statement appearing as fact which isn`t - "while it is known that the composites are estrogenic ..." without any references for you to check.

This is a classic example of printing false and misleading information until enough people see it repeatedly in print that they assume it`s true.

The study Dr. Toal was alluding to was a Spanish study in 1996 [Olea N; et al. Estrogenicity of Resin-Based Composites and Sealants Used in Dentistry. Environmental Health Prospect., 104(3):298-305, 1996], which is probably news to Dr. Toal. The Olea study subjected the composites to extremes of heat (100 C), followed by immersion in the strongest of acid (pH1) or alkaline (pH13) media. Subsequent studies [Release of Estrogenic Component Bisphenol-A not Detected from Fissure Sealants in Vitro, Hamid, A; Hume, WR, J Dent Res., 76(SI):321, #2459,1997 and Bisphenol-A from Dental Materials, Richardson, GM; Clark, KE; Williams, DR, ASTMSTP 1364] contradict the Olea, et al findings.

I enjoy Dental Economics and expect facts, not factoids, in your publication.

Dr. Joe Blaes, editor of Dental Economics, responds: Thanks so much for calling this to my attention. After checking the "facts," I agree that the letter should never have appeared in print.

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