Balancing Your Life

Time strategies deal with the areas where you spend your life and was addressed as managing domimant interests or personal management (August 1998 issue). As discussed, you need to chart out how much time you will devote between three to seven of your most dominant interests - for example, your faith, friends, family, business, and health/leisure. As with any strategy, it`s a broader plan for how your life will unfold.

How to be more intentional,

think more clearly,

do more consistently,

and have what really matters.

Time strategies vs. time tactics

Dick Biggs

Time strategies deal with the areas where you spend your life and was addressed as managing domimant interests or personal management (August 1998 issue). As discussed, you need to chart out how much time you will devote between three to seven of your most dominant interests - for example, your faith, friends, family, business, and health/leisure. As with any strategy, it`s a broader plan for how your life will unfold.

Time tactics deal with how you divide each day among your dominant interests. Call it time management. And, as with any tactic, it provides a more specific method for carrying out a strategy.

How are you spending each day? Are you organized in such a way to maximize this remarkable resource called time? As Franklin Field observed: "The great dividing line between success and failure can be expressed in five words: I did not have time."

You have 24 hours in each day - just like everyone else. Decide which dominant interests will get your attention, then create a time slot on your calendar for every prioritized goal meriting your attention.

Here are 10 terrific time-saving tactics to help you get more out of each day:

1 Be more focused by using the Master Plan Funnel Concept (January 1999 issue). As discussed, the concept is a tool for minimizing procrastination and maximizing performance. With it, you determine purpose, dominant interests, goals, and priorities.

2 Observe the Eight Elite Enhancers of Longer Life (May 1999 issue). They were:

o Get the proper amount of sleep and relaxation.

o Have regular, complete preventive medical and dental exams.

o Eat a balanced, sensible diet and maintain the proper weight.

o Exercise aerobically, reasonably, and consistently.

o Avoid all tobacco products.

o Avoid drugs and use alcohol in moderation, if at all.

o Use home smoke detectors and wear vehicle seat belts.

o Laugh often, particularly at yourself.

3 Minimize procrastination (not starting) by being more decisive (May 1999 issue).

4 Beware of perfectionism (never finishing).

5 Learn to say, "no," without feeling guilty.

6 Believe that it`s easier to be organized than disorganized.

7 Eliminate costly time-wasters, such as needless meetings, excessive interruptions, unnecessary paperwork, etc.

8 Use professional advisers and technology.

9 Make promptness a good habit.

10 Become an exceptional listener.

Dick Biggs is president of Biggs Optimal Living Dynamics. An inspirational speaker, he is the author of If Life Is a Balancing Act, Why Am I So Darn Clumsy? For more information about Mr. Biggs, call (770) 886-3035. His Web site is http://biggspeaks.home.mindspring.com.

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