A letter to McKenzie

Your full-page insult in the November issue of Dental Economics needs a response. This is one (of which I hope were numerous) letters from someone whom you`d probably assume is also "dumber than a box of rocks."

Donna Ramsfield

Maitland, Fla.

Dear Ms. MacKenzie:

Your full-page insult in the November issue of Dental Economics needs a response. This is one (of which I hope were numerous) letters from someone whom you`d probably assume is also "dumber than a box of rocks."

I could also be "Betty Bimbette" who, on a daily basis, is expected to be bright, cheerful, educated, enthusiastic, articulate, energetic, punctual, diplomatic, supportive, creative, etc. Miss Bimbette is commonly selected for the position from a limited field of rocks after a 10-minute interview during which it was explained that she would be earning "the most the practice could afford right now" - which is somewhere slightly over the poverty line. According to most management consultants, the person in this position plays an extremely significant role in the success or failure of the practice. So why waste the budget on Betty? After all, if she is worth more, why would she be working as a dental receptionist?

How interesting that the dentist in your article is "smarter than the Dickens." By this, I assume that she had the tenacity, intelligence, and financial resources to earn her degree and license to practice dentistry. Following that achievement the "smart as the Dickens" dentist began operating with archaic systems, hiring Betty Bimbettes, ignoring training needs, and remaining ignorant of efficient time management, productive appointment scheduling and critical patient relations - all according to your evaluation.

Your recommended solution? "The wisest expenditure right now" would be to hire you! I don`t think so. A management consultant who would be a "wise expenditure" would not stoop to this level of sarcasm, even to describe a dysfunctional practice and staff. There is a much more professional manner in which to define a need for reorganization, retraining, or rehiring.

If Betty Bimbette and the rest of the "three timid gals" are as pathetic as you say, a key component of getting this practice (or any other enterprise) up and running would be respectful mutual support and communication.

I`m glad you quoted Nietzsche. I feel sure that, if he had read your article(s), he would have added to his quote that no one ever learned to stand, walk, or fly being propelled by ridicule and insults.

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