Price of managed care is too high

Nov. 1, 1997
Robert Maccario wrote a very informative article in your September 1997 issue, urging a different look at managed care. In a very detailed sidebar, he profiles a general practice averaging $35,000 in production per month. His calculations speak of incremental income in a situation where fixed expenses already are covered. I believe he misses a major point.

Robert Maccario wrote a very informative article in your September 1997 issue, urging a different look at managed care. In a very detailed sidebar, he profiles a general practice averaging $35,000 in production per month. His calculations speak of incremental income in a situation where fixed expenses already are covered. I believe he misses a major point.

If I decided to become a member of a managed-care program, I believe that it is true that I may, in fact, derive new patients and fill any empty slots in my appointment schedule.

Unfortunately, the many patients I already have who are insured by that company would in that instant no longer be full-fee patients, but would automatically switch to managed care. If I had 300 patients covered by that insurance company who were willing to pay extra to be a part of this practice, and if I discounted all of their fees 30-40 percent, how many new patients would I need, and how much dentistry would I have to do, to merely break even? I know that I probably could come up with a slew of different answers and use statistics to prove each one.

But the fact remains, before I get my first new patient, I would effectively be giving back significant dollars to the insurance company for the privilege of having my name on its list.

Therefore, I continue to believe that unless one`s practice is well below critical mass or if one is practicing in a unique area where managed care is everything, it`s a delivery system that`s best avoided by most mature practices. It might fill some small spots in my schedule, but not at a price that would put more dollars in my pocket.

Steven H. Schwartz, DMD, FAGD

Budd Lake, NJ

Sponsored Recommendations

Clinical Study: OraCare Reduced Probing Depths 4450% Better than Brushing Alone

Good oral hygiene is essential to preserving gum health. In this study the improvements seen were statistically superior at reducing pocket depth than brushing alone (control ...

Clincial Study: OraCare Proven to Improve Gingival Health by 604% in just a 6 Week Period

A new clinical study reveals how OraCare showed improvement in the whole mouth as bleeding, plaque reduction, interproximal sites, and probing depths were all evaluated. All areas...

Chlorine Dioxide Efficacy Against Pathogens and How it Compares to Chlorhexidine

Explore our library of studies to learn about the historical application of chlorine dioxide, efficacy against pathogens, how it compares to chlorhexidine and more.

Enhancing Your Practice Growth with Chairside Milling

When practice growth and predictability matter...Get more output with less input discover chairside milling.